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Table 1 The definitions of a new injury and recurrent injury from consensus statements

From: Recurrent and Subsequent Injuries in Professional and Elite Sport: a Systematic Review

References Sport Injury definition Recurrent injury definition
Orchard et al., 2005 [21] Cricket Any injury or other medical condition that either (a) prevents a player from being fully available for selection for a major match or (b) during a major match, causes a player to be unable to bat, bowl or keep wicket when required by either the rules or the team’s captain. A recurrent injury is one to the same side and body part and of the same injury type as an injury that previously qualified as a significant injury earlier in the same season, but which had recovered.
Fuller et al., 2006 [14] Football Any physical complaint sustained by a player that results from a football match or football training, irrespective of the need for medical attention or time-loss from football activities. An injury that results in a player receiving medical attention is referred to as a “medical-attention” injury and an injury that results in a player being unable to take a full part in future football training or match play as a “time-loss” injury. An injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury and which occurs after a player’s return to full participation from the index injury. A recurrent injury occurring within 2 months of a player’s return to full participation is referred to as an “early recurrence”, one occurring 2 to 12 months after a player’s return to full participation as a “late recurrence” and one occurring more than 12 months after a player’s return to full participation as a “delayed recurrence”.
Fuller et al., 2007 [13] Rugby Any physical complaint, which was caused by a transfer of energy that exceeded the body’s ability to maintain its structural and/or functional integrity, that was sustained by a player during a rugby match or rugby training, irrespective of the need for medical attention or time-loss from rugby activities. An injury that results in a player receiving medical attention is referred to as a “medical-attention” injury and an injury that results in a player being unable to take a full part in future rugby training or match play as a “time-loss” injury. An injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury and which occurs after a player’s return to full participation from the index injury. A recurrent injury occurring within 2 months of a player’s return to full participation is referred to as an “early recurrence”, one occurring 2 to 12 months after a player’s return to full participation as a “late recurrence” and one occurring more than 12 months after a player’s return to full participation as a “delayed recurrence”.
Junge et al., 2008 [16] Multi-sport (IOC) Any musculoskeletal complaint newly incurred due to competition and/or training during the tournament that received medical attention regardless of the consequences with respect to absence from competition or training. An injury of the same location and type, which occurs after an athlete’s return to full participation from the previous injury.
Pluim et al., 2009 [19] Tennis Any physical or psychological complaint or manifestation sustained by a player that results from a tennis match or tennis training, irrespective of the need for medical attention or time-loss from tennis activities. A medical condition of the same type and at the same site linked to an index medical condition and which occurs after a player’s return to full participation from the index medical condition.
Turner et al., 2012 [20] Horseracing Any physical complaint sustained by a person that results from competitive riding, training or other recognised activity that brings a person into contact, or in close vicinity and with the potential for contact, with one or more thoroughbred racehorses, irrespective of the need for medical attention or time-loss from horseracing activities. An injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury, and the one that occurs after a person’s return to full participation in equine-related activities following the index injury.
Timpka et al., 2014 [18] Athletics A physical complaint or observable damage to body tissue produced by the transfer of energy experienced or sustained by an athlete during participation in athletics training or competition, regardless of whether it received medical attention or its consequences with respect to impairments in connection with competition or training. A time-loss injury or illness is one that leads to the athlete being unable to take full part in athletics training and/or competition the day after the incident occurred. An incident of the same type and at the same site linked to an index incident and which occurs after an athlete’s return to full function and participation from the index recordable incident.
Mountjoy et al., 2015 [17] Aquatic A physical complaint or observable damage to body tissue produced by the transfer of energy experienced or sustained by an athlete during participation in training or competition in an aquatic discipline, regardless of whether it received medical attention or its consequences with respect to impairments in competition or training. A time-loss injury or illness leads to the athlete being unable to take full part in FINA activities. Injury to same location and of the same type as the index injury, where the index injury has completely healed.
Orchard et al., 2016 [15] Cricket A general time-loss injury is any injury (or illness) that results in a player being considered unavailable for match play, irrespective of whether a match or training was actually scheduled. A recurrent injury is one of the same type which reoccurs in the same season (surveillance year) after it has been defined as recovered.