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Table 4 Preoperative and postoperative clinical and functional mean scores per study, complications, and take-home message

From: Arthroscopic partial repair for massive rotator cuff tears: does it work? A systematic review

Study Preoperative scores Postoperative scores Complications Take-home message
Berth et al. [11] A: Constant 36.9
DASH 64.6
ROM Abd 97.7°
Add 28°
IR 67.5°
ER 41.7°
A: Constant 58.2
DASH 23.8
ROM Abd 144°
Add 37.2°
IR 79.5°
ER 47°
A: 1 patient with persistent pain was reoperated arthroscopic debridement) In cases of massive rotator cuff rupture, early and mid-term results of partial repair were slightly superior to those of arthroscopic debridement alone.
B: Constant 29.9
DASH 69.5
ROM Abd 93.5°
Add 28°
IR 49.5°
ER 40.5°
B: Constant 40.7
DASH 35.3
ROM Abd 103.5°
Add 35.2°
IR 71.6°
ER 42.7°
B: 1 patient developed severe glenohumeral arthritis and was treated with shoulder hemiarthroplasty
Cuff et al. [12] ASES 46.6
SST 5.6
VAS 6.9
ROM FF 168°
ER 38°
IR 84% full IR
ASES 79.3
SST 9.1
VAS 1.9
ROM FF 154°
ER 39°
IR 80% full IR
3 patients elected for revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty The treatment of massive rotator cuff tears with partial arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy results in midterm subjective satisfaction in the majority of patients.
Francheschi et al. [13] A: Mod UCLA 7.6
VAS 6.7
RC-QOL N.A.
ROM ER 42.9°
IR 37.8°
FF 104.1°
A: Mod UCLA 21.4
VAS 1.5
RC-QOL 61.8
ROM ER 42.9°
IR 37.8°
FF 104.1°
Not reported In the surgical treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears, arthroscopic debridement associated \with acromioplasty and bursectomy and partial repair of rotator cuff tear are both effective in reducing symptoms, with the latter also offering higher functional outcomes.
B: Mod UCLA 8.6
VAS 6.8
RC-QOL N.A.
ROM ER 40.6°
IR 40°
FF 111.5°
B: Mod UCLA 28.8
VAS 1.8
RC-QOL 71.2
ROM ER 50.5°
IR 68.7°
FF 163.5°
Godenèche et al. [14] A: Constant 30.8
Strength 1.1 kg
SSV N.A.
A: Constant 79.7
Strength 5.3 kg
SSV 79.2
Not reported The repair of massive rotator cuff tears with partial or complete repair results in equivalent Constant scores improvement.
B: Constant 32.2
Strength 1.5 kg
SSV N.A.
B: Constant 75.3
Strength 3.6 kg
SSV 70.2
Heuberer et al. [15] N/A A: Constant: 65.8
Q-DASH: 24.1
A: 1 patient with revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty due to pain Arthroscopic debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, and complete rotator cuff repair are effective in treating massive rotator cuff tears. Complete rotator cuff repair shows better short-term results.
B: Constant: 67.5
Q-DASH: 20.5
B: 2 patients with postoperative infections: treated with arthroscopic debridement and lavage, 1 patient with anchor loosening: arthroscopic anchor removal
C: Constant: 80.3
Q-DASH: 7.0
Patients satisfied: A: 87%, B: 86%, C: 91%
C: 1 patient with re-tear and revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty and 1 patient with infection
Holtby et al. [16] A: ASES 42.6
CMS 44.0
ShortWORC 34.6
ROM Flex 110.1°
Abd 102.7°
ER 36.2°
Strength 3.8
A: ASES 71.4
CMS 73.7
ShortWORC 62.7
ROM Flex 129.5°
Abd 121.3°
ER 42.8°
Strength 5.9
Not reported The partial repair of massive rotator cuff tears showed a statistically significant improvement in ROM, strength and disability scores. However, the results were slightly inferior compared to complete repair.
B: ASES 51.0
CMS 47.6
ShortWORC 38.9
ROM Flex 119.9°
Abd 107.2°
ER 44.4°
Strength 4.8
B: ASES 82.8
CMS 87.9
ShortWORC 79.4
ROM Flex 153.4°
Abd 142.5°
ER 49.1°
Strength 9.9
Iagulli et al. [17] A: UCLA 12.1 A: UCLA 29.5 A: 3 patients underwent revision partial repair Partial repair of massive rotator cuff tears yields comparable short-term results to complete repair.
B: UCLA 11.2 B: UCLA 29.6 B: 1 patient sustained traumatic retear and underwent revision complete repair
Kim et al. [18] Constant 43.6
UCLA 10.5
Constant 74.1
UCLA 25.9
Not reported Arthroscopic partial repair and margin convergence showed satisfactory short-term outcomes in massive rotator cuff tears
Mori et al. [19] A: Constant 37.4
ASES 40.8
UCLA 14.3
VAS 7.0
ROM FF 114°
ER 27.9°
IR 17°
A: Constant 81.1
ASES 94.1
UCLA 32.6
VAS 0.3
ROM FF 160.8°
ER 46°
IR 11.6°
No complications In the arthroscopic treatment of irreparable massive rotator cuff tears with low-grade fatty infiltration of infraspinatus, the patch graft showed a lower retear rate (8.3%) than partial repair (41.7%).
B: Constant 36.3
ASES 41.8
UCLA 13.7
VAS 7.0
ROM FF 110.6°
ER 28.1°
IR 17°
B: Constant 69.9
ASES 85.7
UCLA 29.8
VAS 1.2
ROM FF 162.3°
ER 44.6°
IR 11.6°
Paribelli et al. [20] Α: UCLA 7.3
VAS 6.9
RC-QOL n.a.
ROM FF 83.5°
ER 14.5°
Α: UCLA 30.3
VAS 1.3
RC-QOL 81.8
ROM FF 131°
ER 41.2°
A: A rupture of the latissimus dorsi tendon was recorded 13 months postoperatively. A reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was performed. In irreparable rotator cuff tears, arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer and arthroscopic rotator cuff partial repair are both effective ways to treat patients’ symptoms. In younger patients, the first option offers better clinical results.
B: UCLA 7.6
VAS 6.6
RC-QOL n.a.
ROM FF 86.3°
ER 15.8°
B: UCLA 20.1
VAS 1.5
RC-QOL 69.3
ROM FF 110°
ER 38.4°
B: Not reported
Shon et al. [21] ASES 41.97
SST 3.61
VAS 5.13
ROM FF 132.9°
ER 35.5°
IR 10.6°
ASES 73.78
SST 6.07
VAS 3.16
ROM FF not reported
ER not reported
IR not reported
Not reported Arthroscopic partial repair of irreparable massive rotator cuff tears may produce short-term improvement. Fatty infiltration of the teres minor was the identified factor that affected patient-rated satisfaction.